Tag Archives: Development

Half Right

I was talking to a speaker visiting our department recently. While discussing his postdoc work from years ago, he told me about the identification of the sperm factor that causes calcium oscillations in the egg at fertilisation. It was an interesting tale because the group who eventually identified the factor – now widely accepted as PLCzeta – had earlier misidentified the factor, naming it oscillin.

The oscillin paper was published in Nature in 1996 and the subsequent (correct) paper was published in Development in 2002. I wondered what the citation profiles of these papers looks like now.

plcz

As you can see there was intense interest in the first paper that quickly petered out, presumably when people found out that oscillin was a contaminant and not the real factor. The second paper on the other hand has attracted a large number of citations and continues to do so 12 years later – a sign of a classic paper. However, the initial spike in citations was not as high as the Nature paper.

The impact factor of Nature is much higher than that of Development. I’ve often wondered if this is due to a sociological phenomenon: people like to cite Cell/Nature/Science papers rather than those at other journals and this bumps up the impact factor. Before you comment, yes I know there are other reasons, but the IFs do not change much over time and I wonder whether journal hierarchy explains the hardiness of IFs over time. Anyway, these papers struck me as a good test of the idea… Here we have essentially the same discovery, reported by the same authors. The only difference here is the journal (and that one paper is six years after the other). Normally it is not possible to test if the journal influences citations because a paper cannot erased and republished somewhere else. The plot suggests that Nature papers inherently attract much more cites than those in Development, presumably because of the exposure of publishing there. From the graph, it’s not difficult to see that even if a paper turns out not to be right, it can still boost the IF of the journal during the window of assessment. Another reason not to trust journal impact factors.

I can’t think of any way to look at this more systematically to see if this phenomenon holds true. I just thought it was interesting, so I’ll leave it here.


The post title is taken from Half Right by Elliott Smith from the posthumous album New Moon. Bootlegs have the title as Not Half Right, which would also be appropriate.