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The Sound of Clouds: wordcloud of tweets using R

Another post using R and looking at Twitter data.

As I was typing out a tweet, I had the feeling that my vocabulary is a bit limited. Papers I tweet about are either “great”, “awesome” or “interesting”. I wondered what my most frequently tweeted words are.

Like the last post you can (probably) do what I’ll describe online somewhere, but why would you want to do that when you can DIY in R?

First, I requested my tweets from Twitter. I wasn’t sure of the limits of rtweet for retrieving tweets and the request only takes a few minutes. This gives you a download of everything including a csv of all your tweets. The text of those tweets is in a column called ‘text’.

 


## for text mining
library(tm)
## for building a corpus
library(SnowballC)
## for making wordclouds
library(wordcloud)
## read in your tweets
tweets <- read.csv('tweets.csv', stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
## make a corpus of the text of the tweets
tCorpus <- Corpus(VectorSource(tweets$text))
## remove all the punctation from tweets
tCorpus <- tm_map(tCorpus, removePunctuation)
## good idea to remove stopwords: high frequency words such as I, me and so on
tCorpus <- tm_map(tCorpus, removeWords, stopwords('english'))
## next step is to stem the words. Means that talking and talked become talk
tCorpus <- tm_map(tCorpus, stemDocument)
## now display your wordcloud
wordcloud(tCorpus, max.words = 100, random.order = FALSE)

For my @clathrin account this gave:

wordcloud.png

So my most tweeted word is paper, followed by cell and lab. I’m quite happy about that. I noticed that great is also high frequency, which I had a feeling would also be the case. It looks like @christlet, @davidsbristol, @jwoodgett and @cshperspectives are among my frequent twitterings, this is probably a function of the length of time we’ve been using twitter. The cloud was generated using 10.9K tweets over seven years, it might be interesting to look at any changes over this time…

The cloud is a bit rough and ready. Further filtering would be a good idea, but this quick exercise just took a few minutes.

The post title comes from “The Sound of Clouds” by The Posies from their Solid States LP.

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